Nick Exposito

Marketing & New Business Coordinator

10 Writing “Rules” That Are Okay to Break

Don’t begin a sentence with a “but” or “and”. Don’t ever write in passive voice. Never start a sentence with “because”. How many of you have ever heard these writing “rules” from a teacher or authority figure? My guess is all of you.

I recently attended a writing seminar hosted by Association Media & Publishing (AM&P) and the topic was “Back to the Basics: Writing for Associations.” Leslie O’Flahavan led this fun and interactive workshop, and she gave great insight on why it is okay to go ahead and BREAK all of those writing “rules” and get them out of your head.

Here are the 10 writing rules Leslie says can be broken:

  1. Don’t begin a sentence with “but” or “and”.
  2. Don’t end a sentence with a preposition.
  3. Don’t begin a sentence with “because”.
  4. Don’t write a one-sentence paragraph.
  5. Don’t use contractions in business writing.
  6. Don’t use “they” as a singular pronoun.
  7. Don’t split an infinitive.
  8. Don’t write a fragment.
  9. Don’t begin a sentence with “however” or “therefore”.
  10. Don’t write in passive voice. Ever.

When writing for your organization, all of these rules can be broken. Yes, all of them. Thanks to blogging and social media, a more casual and informal writing tone is now not only accepted but often expected. So live on the wild side and break rules a little bit! Just be careful that u don’t go 2 crazy w/ it. ;)

What other writing “rules” do you think need to be broken from time to time?

Nick Exposito

Marketing & New Business Coordinator

How to Use Social Media for Your Business

As the Marketing Coordinator at Matrix Group, I’ve started to use social media on a daily
basis not just to connect with my friends, but to see what is going on in the world and to see what is trending from a business and marketing standpoint. I’m also learning a lot about how to use social media to connect with your clients and constituents so they can better connect with you.

I recently attended a digital writing class hosted by Carrie Hane, Principal of Tanzen Consulting, where I learned about everything from creating better emails to writing for SEO. The topic I found most interesting, though, was writing for social media, since I use it on a daily basis and it’s something you don’t learn a lot about in college or in school in general.

My top takeaways about writing for social media were:

  • Always put your audience first – what are they interested in? What content can you share to best meet their needs?
  • Use calls to action!
  • Aim to be shareable. More shares = more likes = more interest = more business!
  • Keep in mind that your social channels and each post are part of a much bigger story.
  • Use hashtags to be found and to join the larger conversation
  • Think about how you can differentiate your content – there is a lot of noise on social media, so what can you do to stand out in the crowd?

While all of these are great ideas to keep in mind when it comes to writing for social media, each platform is different and requires a slightly different strategy, so there are some quick tips that I learned for how and what to post to each channel:

  • Twitter
    • The ideal tweet shouldn’t exceed 100 characters and needs to be more than 70.
    • Add photos to your tweets whenever possible
    • Share 4 to 5 relevant pieces of content that are not your everyday, such as blog pages, articles, or retweets of a relevant quote.
    • Make sure you are following your customers back!
  • Facebook
    • Share business news and current topics that are happening in the industry.
    • Always try and include pictures with your posts – you will get more engagement from your audience.
    • Facebook allows unlimited text in your posts, but the ideal length for a post is above 40 characters but less than 120.
  • Instagram
    • Use great pictures or short videos to get a lot of traffic.
    • Have a balance of posts between “fun” images and business related / promotional images
    • Try to keep posts to under 150 characters, and keep in mind that only the first 140 characters will display before they get cut off and users have to click “more” to see the rest.

And one more piece of advice for all platforms: regularly update your profile picture and cover photo; it’ll keep your audience more engaged with your page.

I had a great time attending Carrie’s workshop, and as you can see I learned a ton! If you’re interested in hearing more from Carrie on writing for the web, make sure to check out the Matrix Minute video that CEO Joanna Pineda recorded with her about How Writing for Digital is Different.

What other tips do you have for using social media for business? I’m all ears!