Leah Monica

Director of Marketing

Social Media Tool: Hootlet Extension

If you’re in marketing, you know how time consuming posting and monitoring social media can be. It can easily swallow hours of your work day. Yes, hours.

As I mentioned before, I’m all about the productivity hacks this year, and am diving deep into the world of Chrome extensions to try to streamline my work and personal life. My current favorite extension for efficiency in the social media department is the the Hootlet extension for Chrome and Firefox. If you use Hootsuite to manage your social media accounts like we do, you need this, plain and simple!

Why is it so great? It allows you to share articles or web pages that you are reading/visiting, without ever having to switch tabs or copy/paste a single URL or string of text. While it may not seem like either of those things are that much of a nuisance, you’d be shocked at how much time the back-and-forth swallows, and how easy it is to get lost and distracted when you’re juggling 15-20 tabs at once (that’s not just me, right?).

With the Hootlet extension, all you have to do is click the Hootlet icon in the browser toolbar, and the familiar Hootsuite draft box will pop up on the webpage, pre-populated with the page title and URL. From there, you can customize your message, add a photo or attachment, and choose to either share the social media post immediately or schedule it for later, without ever leaving the webpage. Life changing!

Another cool feature? If you see a quote in an article that you’d like to share, you can quickly do so by highlighting the text, right-clicking, and clicking on “share via Hootlet.” The draft box will then pop up with the highlighted text, and a shortened link to the article.

Sharing made easy! Can’t beat that.

What are some of your favorite social media productivity tools?

Leah Monica

Director of Marketing

Favorite Tool: Google Page Analytics Chrome Extension

For me, 2017 is all about productivity hacks and working more efficiently. Recently, I’ve been diving deep into the world of Google Chrome extensions to help me streamline as much of my work (and personal life) as possible.

One of my current favorite tools is the Page Analytics extension for Chrome. With just a quick glance, it shows you how your users are interacting with your site, in an easily digestible format.

How does it work?

Once you have the extension installed and turned on, you will see the analytics data pop up on any webpage you visit that you have access to in Google Analytics. Keep in mind that this requires that you are logged into the Google account in Chrome that is tied to your Google Analytics account.

When the extension is turned on, you’ll be able to see:

  • Metrics such as pageviews, unique pageviews, average time on page, bounce rate, and exit percentage. You can also use the date comparison and segmentation tools directly in the extension for these metrics.
  • The number of active, real-time visitors on your site.
  • In-page click-through rate analysis.

I love that in the middle of a marketing meeting when someone asks, “Hey – does anyone know if our users are actually clicking on the calls to action in our rotating branding area?” I can quickly pull up our website to see how many people have clicked through in the last month. It’s also a heck of a lot easier to take a quick, high-level peek at the traffic on any given page of our website than it is to log in to Google Analytics and dig for that information. Pretty great, right?

While I still very strongly suggest doing a deep dive into your Google Analytics reports once a month at minimum, it’s great to be able to get a rough idea of what pages users are visiting, what’s working, and what’s not working in a matter of seconds.

One very important thing to note about the click analysis, however, (and one of my only gripes with this extension as I think it’s a bit misleading at first glance), is that the click-through rate is for each destination page. For example, if you have three separate links to your events page on your homepage – in the navigation, right rail, and footer – they will all show the same number of clicks, even though the link in the navigation may have gotten the most number of individual clicks. Therefore, the click analysis isn’t good indicator of the success of link placement. Just something to keep in mind!

What are some of your favorite Chrome extensions for working more efficiently?

Elaine Heinzman

Content Strategist and Information Architect

3 Must-Haves for Creating Content That Counts

4 reasons why content mattersI love content in all its forms and formats: Video, audio, animation, news articles, op-ed pieces, how-to columns, tweets, Facebook Messenger, and so on. And I love working with clients to help them surface the best of their content, from the newest publications to trusty standbys that members always need to access.

Along with Matrix Group CEO and Chief Troublemaker Joanna Pineda, I recently co-presented a webinar about content marketing. Content is so crucial to connecting people to your organization and brand that we wanted to share a quick-hits list for those who didn’t attend the webinar.

  1. Insight sets you apart.We talk to a lot of website and mobile-app users across industries, from longtime association members to disgruntled former members. These users keep telling us that they want insight: Insight into the future of their particular industry, into how the industry interacts with consumers, and into trends currently affecting your organization and industry, including legislative and market forces. You can best serve your members if you provide them with regular, thoughtful analysis to help them learn, grow their businesses, and stay out of trouble.
  2. Video gets people’s, and platforms’, attention. Inc. reports that people are 85% more likely to make a purchase after viewing a video about the product, and posts with images get 650% higher engagement than text-only posts. About two-thirds of U.S. adults are on Facebook, where image- and video-focused posts appear more prominently. So there’s no excuse not to incorporate more video into your content strategy. It’s as simple as shooting a 30- to 60-second how-to video or interview with a conference attendee on your smartphone. Also make sure to post plenty of member photos on Facebook, and tag the people in them.
  3. Plan it out. You need an editorial calendar to produce and publish content throughout the year. You can establish content themes by month or by quarter, depending on how much content your organization is able to create. If your industry or organization publishes a trade magazine, you can follow that editorial calendar.The content schedule also depends on what I call “the best talkers”: These are employees and members within your organization, along with your industry’s leaders, who are knowledgeable, opinionated, and skilled at explaining things in an engaging and easy-to-understand manner. Get those people to blog, shoot video, or record podcasts for you. If they don’t have time to do so, interview them and ghost-write a piece for them.

When interacting with your organization, members want to know: “What’s in it for me?” Your website content answers that question by showcasing what you know and why it matters. It reinforces your mission to members, and to the search engines they rely on to find your site. Content allows you to demonstrate why your organization helps members and the industry do better and be better.

What tips and tricks do you have for creating content? Where do you feel you need help with your content strategy? Tell us here or talk to us on Twitter (@matrixgroup).

Leah Monica

Director of Marketing

Using UTM Codes for Better Google Analytics Reporting

URL-smIt’s no secret that we’ve been seriously geeking out about everything Google Analytics here at Matrix Group. We’ve been endlessly exploring, experimenting and testing and have been blown away by the amount of invaluable data we’ve been able to collect for our clients, down to the granular who/what/when/where/how/why. We’ve said it before, and we’ll keeping saying it until we’re blue in the face: you simply can’t afford to ignore your analytics reporting!

Want to start digging deeper but not sure where to start? You’re not alone! Our clients frequently ask us for one or two simple things they can do to get started, and our No. 1 answer is: start with UTM codes.

UTM codes are code snippets that you can attach to custom URLs that track a source, medium, and campaign name. This information gets passed to Google Analytics and identifies where your traffic is coming from and what campaigns are driving the traffic. Invaluable data!

Here are a few of our top tips for using UTM codes:

    • Create a spreadsheet to track codes and campaigns. Having everything planned out and stored in one place will not only help you visualize your whole campaign, but it will also ensure more accurate reporting, especially if you have multiple staff members working on one campaign.
    • Keep your tags consistent. UTM codes are case sensitive, so make sure you stick to the same permutations of upper and lower case!
    • Use dashes, not spaces, to separate words. While a UTM URL builder will allow you to use spaces, it makes the URL look a lot less clean. Example: “CEO blog post” will become CEO%20blog%20post. Instead, try CEO-blog-post. Doesn’t that look better?
    • Use a URL Builder to create links. These tools are very easy to use and will save you time and heartburn over building the URLs yourself.
    • Use a URL shortener, where appropriate. When you use UTM codes, the URLs can get quite lengthy and ugly. Use URL shorteners to make the links more visually appealing. There are tons of easy-to-use URL shortener tools out there (we like goo.gl), so make use of them!
    • Never send out a link to your site without a UTM code in place!

Looking for other Google Analytics tips and tricks? Check out CEO Joanna Pineda’s recent blog posts on Google Analytics. There’s some great info there! If you want a little more hands-on guidance and assistance, don’t hesitate to give us a call. We’d love to help you in any way we can.

Have any other tips for getting started with Google Analytics? What are your favorite reports and hacks?

Kevin Tomko

Project Manager

Everything Is Going Live

periscopeDid you read about it in the newspaper? Already old news.

How about on Twitter? Soon to be old news.

All information, including news, entertainment, sports, concerts, interviews, etc., will eventually be accessible in real time on your mobile devices.

You can already see it happening. We watch live sporting events on phones and get up-to-the-second stats on smartwatches; we are able to get live streams on our phones to see what’s happening in our homes with security cameras.

When I heard about the wildfires in Canada, I thought I’d jump on Periscope to see if anyone was reporting anything. I watched thirty minutes of live coverage from a local news station showing the fire, people evacuating, etc. It was so interesting to see it live. As I was about to hop off, I saw a Scope that had 18,000 viewers, so I checked it out. I then began to watch the AC/DC concert live from Portugal with Axl Rose from the point of view of someone in the very front row. It was so cool.  I immediately Air Dropped it onto my TV and watched the last hour of the show. It was awesome!  Fire!

Needless to say, there are a lot of mundane Periscoping out there. Like high school kids geeking out about how many hearts their scope is getting or John Smith scoping his commute to work.

All of this got me thinking about what we do, what our clients do, and how can we best use this technology.

  • How are you using video now on your site?
  • How are you disseminating news?
  • What about your social media strategy?

Could you replace any of these with something as easy to use as Periscope or Facebook Live Video? Pretty much everyone of us is carrying a camera-equipped mobile device in our pockets – what’s stopping us from taking video right now?

Think about how powerful that could be during an annual conference! You could stream the keynote speech on Livestream. The staff could run their own live “Man (or Woman) on the Street” series between sessions and events. Attendees could share their Scopes with the same hashtag on your Twitter feed, and suddenly your event can have thousands of viewer hours.

Here are just some examples of live streaming outlets:

Can you imagine what else will be possible? I don’t know about you, but I can’t wait to find out.  Hmmm?  Maybe I should have live streamed me typing up this blog about live streaming?  JK, no one wants to see stuff like that!

Are you using live-streaming video now? What platform are you using? Let us know in the comments!