Creating Savvy Surveys for Better Member Feedback

Conference Attendee Feedback Here in the D.C. metro area, midsummer means high tourist season — and the middle of convention-planning season. Several of our association clients are ramping up for their annual conventions in August, September, or October, and that planning includes the convention post-mortem: Association staffs return home and look to their members, sponsors, and vendors to see what went right–and wrong–at this year’s meeting.  

Associations Now recently shared ideas for questions that are often missing from post-convention surveys. As someone who’s attended conferences on user experience, content strategy, and journalism, I’d love it if the folks behind the conventions would prompt us attendees with more specific questions about why we even went in the first place. Associations Now says the reason we go is primarily “to make connections and get practical ideas that [we] can implement once [we’re] back in the office,” but is that always the case?

Here are some other suggested questions that can help to give your organization better insight:

  • What were your top goals heading into the conference? Encourage attendees to get specific about why they registered in the first place or what they wanted to achieve, like sitting in on a certain workshop, learning about a new tool, or getting warm introductions to potential clients.
  • How well were you able to meet those goals? Do attendees express frustration about missing multiple sessions because they were programmed within the same time slot? Did they have a hard time getting into a really crowded happy hour event? The answers here can give you insight into how you might adjust the schedule for next time.
  • What sessions/events did you find the most useful for your goals? For making connections with people? These questions drill down into what worked and what didn’t. If a once-popular event drew little traffic this year, it’s time to rethink repeating it next year.
  • What were the most meaningful conversations that you had? What were the most meaningful connections that you made? These questions can be a way to get the pulse on what people were most interested in or concerned about. Maybe it’s an industry-wide issue, or maybe it was a subject specific to the convention.

To make it easier for people to answer these questions, make sure to create boxes that allow a greater number of characters (for the more long-winded respondents) and that use a larger, sans serif font.

And it’s always nice to offer an incentive for folks to complete the survey, like a discount code for a webinar or a chance to a win free or discounted conference registration for next time.

What other questions do you think should always be asked post-conference?

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About Elaine Heinzman

At heart, Elaine’s role is that of professional storyteller. She helps identify the most important information and how best to present it for clients and Matrix Group alike. She entered journalism at age 12 with her middle-school paper, earned a double-major degree in print journalism and American studies from the University of Miami, spent years in the magazine industry, and was a producer with NPR for nine years.

Elaine is passionate about storytelling in all forms – she’s gleefully medium- and platform-agnostic – and about mentoring the next generation of journalists. Fun fact: She’s in a local women’s parkour group, which helped her learn how to run up an 8-foot wall.

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