Doing the Two-Step…Verification, that is

Have you seen those commercials about identity theft – you know, the ones where a petite woman is shopping, but in reality, it’s some bruiser of a guy who’s stolen her identity. Funny, right? Only, not really.

In today’s online world, keeping yourself safe isn’t as easy as having passwords to your accounts. Sure, you can use a password management software (LastPass, 1Password, etc) and have unique, complicated password for each website, but is that enough?

Not anymore.

Passwords are only the first step in keeping that gate closed. They are a single point of failure. If someone can guess (or get access to) your password, then Burly Guy is now pretending to be you and going on a shopping spree at Best Buy.

What do you do? hand holding smartphone

As with guarding your car against thieves, you want to have double protection. You lock your car and have an anti-theft system, right? To achieve this online, you should adopt two-step verification (sometimes called two-factor authentication or 2FA.) It’s a much more secure solution than just passwords.

A good example of this is your ATM card – you have the card (1 step) and you have a PIN (2nd step). If you lose your card, unless you wrote the PIN on the card itself, it’s highly unlikely that someone can use the card to withdraw cash.

That’s the point of 2FA – make it harder for potential online thieves to access your accounts.

Using Two-Step Verification

Setting up 2FA is done individually for each account and many online services offer it as a matter of course. Google, Twitter, Facebook and more are prime examples. These are all high-level targets of cyber thieves.

To set up the two-step verification, simply follow the directions provided by your online service. Usually, it’s as simple as providing a mobile phone number. The service then uses your phone to text you when you log in. They’ll send a text message with a unique code (usually a string of numbers), which you then enter after log in. Simple, right?

So, what are you waiting for? Go on, log in to your accounts and set it up. It’s an easy way to throw up another barrier to cyber criminals.

For more information:

Two-factor authentication: What you need to know (FAQ)
Here’s Everywhere You Should Enable Two-Factor Authentication Right Now

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